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Wristbands for Health

A team led by Kim Anderson, professor in the College of Agricultural Sciences, has created a silicone wristband that absorbs chemicals in the air 24/7.

Down to the Gulf

Bruce Mate didn’t wait long. Within days of the April 20 Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico, he was on the phone with officials from the U.S. Minerals Management Service. He and other OSU researchers are analyzing consequences of the largest spill in U.S. waters. Meanwhile, Oregon photographer Justin Bailie was on the scene in Terrebonne Parish.

After the Spill

Composed of more than 100 different compounds, PAHs are part of fossil fuels and a product of combustion. Some cause cancer, birth defects and other health problems. To understand these chemicals, Sarah Allan melds her biology background with the growing cache of analytical chemistry skills that she is developing in Kim Anderson’s lab.

Living Downwind

By collecting and testing the toxicity of particles in Northwest air samples, OSU Ph.D. student Julie Layshock is shedding light on the relative health threat posed by long-distance air pollution.