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Nomads No More

Pressure from encroaching modernization threatens traditional patterns of migration and collaboration in Inner Mongolia. Tom Conte, master’s student in anthropology, traveled there to learn about impacts on the grasslands and Mongolian culture.

Running Clear

The Arctic Ocean, 1997. Gary Klinkhammer had strapped a water chemistry analyzer onto the hull of a retired U.S. Navy nuclear submarine to measure carbon. He had come to this bleak and desolate place looking for organic matter, fertile detritus dumped into the ocean by massive rivers in Siberia and North America.

Data Driven

When Chris Patton was helping his Formula SAE team design a racecar for international competition, he made an unusual suggestion: angle the rear wheels outward in relation to the car. Common knowledge would warn against that move. Turning the rear tires outward makes the car less stable.

Cascadia Roulette

Bob Yeats has spent his career preparing people for the possible: a catastrophic earthquake

After the Spill

Composed of more than 100 different compounds, PAHs are part of fossil fuels and a product of combustion. Some cause cancer, birth defects and other health problems. To understand these chemicals, Sarah Allan melds her biology background with the growing cache of analytical chemistry skills that she is developing in Kim Anderson’s lab.

Girl GIRL Boy Boy

At the “Shahargaon” community clinic near Delhi in 2008, Sunil Khanna worked with doctors and community workers to learn about women’s reproductive heath-care needs and their views on son preference. Khanna’s interviews helped him develop community-based intervention programs. (Photo: Lakshman Anand)